E-Safety at All Saints CE Academy Denstone

Here at All Saints we believe that safety on the internet is paramount and during your child’s time at school we actively monitor and filter internet access but it is not always easy for parents to do so in the same way.

As well as computer access, more commonly smartphones are an increasing source of internet use, and while overall the internet and social media can be a positive force for good, it is important we as a school recognise that it can also in some cases cause issues for pupils at the school.

Top Tips for talking about staying safe online

  • Talk to your child about what they’re up to online. Be a part of their online life; involve the whole family and show an interest. Find out what sites they visit and what they love about them, if they know you understand they are more likely to come to you if they have any problems.
  • Watch Thinkuknow films and cartoons with your child. The Thinkuknow site has films, games and advice for children from five all the way to 16.
  • Encourage your child to go online and explore! There is a wealth of age-appropriate sites online for your children. Encourage them to use sites which are fun, educational and that will help them to develop online skills.
  • Keep up-to-date with your child’s development online. Children grow up fast and they will be growing in confidence and learning new skills daily. It’s important that as your child learns more, so do you.
  • Set boundaries in the online world just as you would in the real world. Think about what they might see, what they share, who they talk to and how long they spend online. It is important to discuss boundaries at a young age to develop the tools and skills children need to enjoy their time online.
  • Discuss with your older children what they should or shouldn’t be showing their younger siblings on the internet, mobile devices, games consoles and other devices.
  • Keep all equipment that connects to the internet in a family space. For children of this age, it is important to keep internet use in family areas so you can see the sites your child is using and be there for them if they stumble across something they don’t want to see.
  • Know what connects to the internet and how. Nowadays even the TV connects to the internet. Make sure you’re aware of which devices that your child uses connect to the internet, such as their phone or games console. Also, find out how they are accessing the internet – is it your connection, or a neighbour’s wifi? This will affect whether the safety setting you set are being applied.
  • Use parental controls on devices that link to the internet, such as the TV, laptops, computers, games consoles and mobile phones. Parental controls are not just about locking and blocking, they are a tool to help you set appropriate boundaries as your child grows and develops. They are not the answer to your child’s online safety, but they are a good start and they are not as difficult to install as you might think. Service providers are working hard to make them simple, effective and user friendly

Find your service provider and learn how to set your controls

Starting a conversation about online safety

It can be difficult to know how to start talking to your child about what they’re doing online or who they might be speaking to. But talking regularly, like you would about their day at school, will help your child feel relaxed and mean that when they do have any worries, they’re more likely to come and speak to you. It can help to:

    • reassure them that you’re interested in their life, offline and online. Recognise that they’ll be using the internet to research homework as well talking to their friends.
    • ask your child to show you what they enjoy doing online or apps they’re using so you can understand them.
    • be positive but also open about anything you’re worried about. You could say “I think this site’s really good” or “I’m a little worried about things I’ve seen here.”
    • ask them if they’re worried about anything, and let them know they can come to you.
    • ask them about their friends online and how they know they are who they say they are.
    • listen for the reasons why your child wants to use apps or site you don’t think are suitable, so you can talk about these together.
    • ask your child what they think’s okay for children of different ages so they feel involved in the decision making.

FIFA 21

Football is the world’s most popular sport, so it’s hardly surprising that a consistently slick and realistic football simulation has become the world’s best-selling sports video game. FIFA 21, the latest incarnation in the perennially popular franchise, has been another runaway success – even though critics have noted that changes from FIFA 20 are cosmetic and minor.

While the game’s loyal fans (millions of whom are children) continue to go wild for FIFA, many parents and carers do have some reservations. The game offers unmoderated audio chat, for example, while FIFA’s variety and playability can make it addictive, and the in-game FUT packs – which function much the same way as loot boxes – can not only be expensive but could also promote gambling.

Thinkuknow is a very informative website with lots of information for parents. Please click on the image below to access the website.

Please see useful guides for parents from the Thinkuknow web site:

Thinkuknow e safety newsletter - February 2021

Grooming

Worried your child has shared too much online

Worried your child will see something inappropriate online

Using Parental Controls

Reporting to CEOP

We are proud to be a part of SUA Trust

Join the Trust

SUAT supports and leads in the set-up of new academies joining the partnership. The sevices provided by the central support function cover both educational and non-educational support. In terms of educational support, SUAT is linked to the School of Education of Staffordshire University, which is an outstanding ITT provider.